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When life normalizes again (according to experts)

June 30, 2020

Data from more than 500 epidemiologists and infectious disease specialists in the United States and Canada show when normalcy could return.

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When life normalizes again (according to experts)
When life normalizes again (according to experts)

This story originally appeared in the World Economic Forum

By Iman Ghosh, Visual Capitalist

From battles at the front to social alienation of friends and family, COVID-19 has massively disrupted our daily lives.

After questioning everything from hugging loved ones to delaying the trip, there is one big question everyone is concerned about: will we ever return to the status quo? The answer may not be very clear.

Today’s diagram uses data from interviews from the New York Times 511 epidemiologists and infectious disease specialists from the United States and Canada see their views on when they are expected to resume a number of typical activities.

When will life return to normal?

When will life return to normal? / Picture: Visual capitalist

Life in the near future, experts say

In particular, this group was asked by epidemiologists when they could personally participate in 20 joint daily activities again.

The responses, based on the latest scientifically-based publicly available data, varied based on assumptions about local pandemic response plans. The experts also found that their reactions would change due to possible treatments and test rates in their local areas.

These are the activities most professionals see this summer or within a year:

The activities most professionals see started this summer or within a year.

The activities that most professionals see started this summer or within a year / Image: Visual Capitalist
The need to be outdoors is pretty clear: 56% of respondents are waiting to take a trip before the end of summer. In the meantime, 31% thought they could go hiking or picnicking with their friends this summer, pointing out the need for “fresh air, sunshine, companionship, and healthy activity” to maintain their physical and mental health during this time . .

Public transportation and travel of any kind are an issue that has been put on hold, be it by plane, train or car. Many of the epidemiologists surveyed also complained about the stress the relationship has had on the pandemic, as evidenced by the social situations they hope will resume sooner rather than later.

The worst consequence of the epidemic is the loss of human contact.

– Eduardo Franco, McGill University

On the other hand, there are certain activities that they considered too risky to undertake. A large part postpones participation in celebrations such as weddings or concerts by at least a year or more due to the perceived social responsibility.

Due to the perceived social responsibility, fewer people take part in celebrations such as weddings for at least one year or more.

Due to the perceived social responsibility, fewer people take part in celebrations such as weddings for at least one year or more.

Image: visual capitalist

Perhaps the most surprising result is that 6% of epidemiologists never expect to hug or shake hands after the pandemic. In addition, more than half believe that masks are required for at least the next year.

The virus sets the timeline

Of course, these estimates are not meant to represent all situations. The experts also practically checked whether certain activities were avoidable or not – like the profession itself – which has an impact on individual risk levels.

The answers [sobre la reanudación de estas actividades] They have nothing to do with calendar time.

– Kristi McClamroch, University of Albany

While many places are coming out of closure and reopening to support the economy, some officials are still warning against lifting the restrictions ahead of time before we can fully control the virus and its spread.