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Trump says he’s a ‘very stable genius’ and ‘like, really smart’

Facing increasing questions over his mental stability after the publication of an explosive new tell-all book, President Donald Trump insisted Saturday that he is a “very stable genius.”

In a series of tweets early on Saturday morning, Trump accused his critics of “taking out the old Ronald Reagan playbook and screaming mental stability and intelligence.”

“Actually, throughout my life, my two greatest assets have been mental stability and being, like, really smart,” the president added in a follow-up tweet.

Trump says he’s a ‘very stable genius’ and ‘like, really smart’
Trump says he’s a ‘very stable genius’ and ‘like, really smart’

During former President Reagan’s second term in office there was continued speculation about his state of mind. Five years after leaving office in 1994, Reagan publicly announced that he suffered from Alzheimer’s disease.

Now that Russian collusion, after one year of intense study, has proven to be a total hoax on the American public, the Democrats and their lapdogs, the Fake News Mainstream Media, are taking out the old Ronald Reagan playbook and screaming mental stability and intelligence…..

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 6, 2018

….Actually, throughout my life, my two greatest assets have been mental stability and being, like, really smart. Crooked Hillary Clinton also played these cards very hard and, as everyone knows, went down in flames. I went from VERY successful businessman, to top T.V. Star…..

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 6, 2018

….to President of the United States (on my first try). I think that would qualify as not smart, but genius….and a very stable genius at that!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 6, 2018

Trump’s stream of tweets came after Michael Wolff, the author of the new book that gives a behind-the-scenes account of the White House, said everyone he spoke to for the book described the president as childlike.

Wolff, in an exclusive interview on NBC’s “Today,” defended his work Friday, insisting he spoke with Trump on the record and calling the commander in chief “a man who has less credibility than, perhaps, anyone who has ever walked on earth.”


‘Fire and Fury’ author Michael Wolff: ‘I absolutely’ spoke to President Trump8:12

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Wolff said that everyone he spoke to described the president the same way.

“I will tell you the one description that everyone gave, everyone has in common: They all say he is like a child,” Wolff explained. “And what they mean by that is, he has a need for immediate gratification. It is all about him.”

Wolff added that “100 percent of the people around” Trump, “senior advisers, family members, every single one of them, questions his intelligence and fitness for office.”

Trump hit back at Wolff in a tweet late on Friday, claiming the author had made up stories and used his former chief strategist “Sloppy Steve Bannon” to sell the book.

Michael Wolff is a total loser who made up stories in order to sell this really boring and untruthful book. He used Sloppy Steve Bannon, who cried when he got fired and begged for his job. Now Sloppy Steve has been dumped like a dog by almost everyone. Too bad! https://t.co/mEeUhk5ZV9

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 6, 2018

Trump is set to huddle with congressional Republicans, Cabinet secretaries and aides at Camp David this weekend to discuss their 2018 legislative priorities.

A long list of high-stakes topics are on the agenda, including the budget, infrastructure, immigration, welfare reform and the 2018 midterm elections.

“We’re going to Camp David with a lot of the great Republican senators, and we’re making America great again,” Trump said Friday afternoon as he left the White House for the presidential retreat in Maryland’s Catoctin Mountains. He was joined Friday evening by Vice President Mike Pence, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker Paul Ryan, among others.

Related: A new year brings an increasingly isolated President Trump

“Fire and Fury” features behind-the-scenes anecdotes from Trump’s White House, including details on how the most powerful men and women in Washington worked to make Trump president — and then turned on one another after he took the oath of office.

Wolff writes in the book, and explained during his “Today” interview, that top aides said at various points that Trump is “a moron, an idiot.”

“Actually there’s a competition to sort of get to the bottom line here of who this man is. Let’s remember, this man does not read, does not listen. So he’s like a pinball, just shooting off the sides,” Wolff said.


‘Fire and Fury’ book raises concerns about Trump’s mental capacity, analyst says2:49

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Wolff revealed how people around the president noticed an apparent decline in his mental stamina.

“In the beginning, it was like every 25 or 30 minutes, you would get the same three stories repeated,” Wolff said about Trump. “Now it’s the same three stories in every 10 minutes.”

Wolff was then asked to elaborate on an anecdote he described in an article in The Hollywood Reporter this week in which he said Trump, at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida over the winter holiday break, didn’t recognize old friends.

“I will quote Steve Bannon — he’s lost it,” Wolff said, referring to Trump’s former strategist.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, appearing on Fox News Friday morning, said it was “outrageous to make these types of accusations” about Trump’s mental health.

It’s “sad that people are going and making these desperate attempts to attack the president,” she added.

Widely reported excerpts from the book have roiled Washington, including claims from Bannon that Donald Trump Jr.’s meeting with Russians at Trump Tower in June 2016 was “treasonous” and “unpatriotic.”

Trump threatened his former chief strategist with legal action and said Bannon had “lost his mind” after being fired from the White House.

The president has apparently referred to Bannon as “Sloppy Steve,” on Twitter repeatedly in the days since.

Related: Trump rises with Bannon’s fall

On Friday afternoon, as he left the White House for a weekend at Camp David, he ignored shouted questions from reporters about whether he had read the book himself yet.

Wolff’s book was released early Friday by Henry Holt, which announced a day earlier that it was pushing up the publication date due to demand. Earlier Thursday, Trump attorney Charles Harder demanded in a letter sent to Wolff and his publisher that the book not be published or disseminated. The book reached No. 1 on the Amazon best-seller list Wednesday.

A copy of the letter obtained by NBC News cites defamation, libel and “actual malice” among the alleged wrongdoings in the book.

NBC News has not confirmed much of the book. Wolff has been accused in the past of suspect reporting, most notably in his 1998 book “Burn Rate.” In its review, the now-defunct media journal Brill’s Content cited 13 people depicted in the book as saying that Wolff invented or changed quotations and that they couldn’t recall his taking any notes or recording their interviews.

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