To mark the anniversary of the coup, the US is sanctioning seven individuals and two Burmese organizations

The United States Treasury Department announced on Monday the imposition of a new package of sanctions against seven people and two entities linked to Burma’s military junta, a measure taken to mark the first anniversary of the February 1, 2021 coup asian country.

In that sense, the Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) has clarified that these sanctions were imposed jointly with the UK and Canada – who in turn imposed sanctions on four other senior board members -.

“Over the past year, the Burmese army has attempted to consolidate its power through fear among pro-democracy movements and the general population, prompting security forces to kill innocent people, including children, and target opposition leaders and peaceful protesters The U.S. Treasury Department said in a statement.

To mark the anniversary of the coup, the US is sanctioning seven individuals and two Burmese organizations
To mark the anniversary of the coup, the US is sanctioning seven individuals and two Burmese organizations

The text also warns that “the regime’s control over resources and its absolute lack of transparency contribute to significant levels of corruption” in the country. Brian E. Nelson, Secretary of the Treasury Department for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, said that a year after the coup, “the United States and its allies stand with the people as they seek freedom and democracy.”

“We will continue to crack down on those responsible for the ongoing violence and those enabling the brutal repression of the Burmese people and their supporters,” he said.

Among those sanctioned are three senior members of the Burmese junta: Thida Oo, the attorney general who would be behind the charges against “former de facto leader” Aung San Suu Kyi, Tun Oo, the junta’s chief judge, and Tin Oo , who heads the anti-corruption commission.

Among the companies and individuals accused of supporting the military regime are KT Services Logistics Company Limited, Jonathan Myo Kyaw, director of a subsidiary of the company.

Also included in the list are Tay Za, who has offered military support, and several of his sons, Htoo Htet Tay Za and Pye Phyo Tay Za. In addition, the government of the North American country has again warned of the “dangers” currently associated with “doing business” in Burma given the “increasing control of the army over the economy”.

As a result of the sanctions, which are not intended to be permanent, these individuals’ property and interests in the United States, as well as any businesses that fall directly or indirectly into the hands of the sanctioned individuals, will be frozen.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken has stressed Washington’s rejection of the “military regime” and has reiterated the call for the country to “return to the democratic path”.

However, he recalled that “tragically, the regime has killed about 1,500 people, including women and children, and arrested another 10,000 in its violent and continuous attempt to tighten its control”.

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