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The UN warns that the “fuzzy” provisions of the Hong Kong Security Act open the door to irregularities

July 3, 2020

The United Nations announced earlier this Friday that the provisions of the new Chinese security law that entered into force in Hong Kong this week are so vague that their application could result in human rights violations that take advantage of the law’s vagueness of its terms.

“After our preliminary analysis, we are concerned that the definitions of some of the crimes contained in the law are vague and too broad,” said the spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Rupert Colville.

The new national security law implies that the Beijing government will exercise jurisdiction over “complicated” cases in Hong Kong, such as those involving foreign interventions when local authorities cannot enforce the law or when the national security of the territory is “serious or.” realistic “threats as set out in the legal text published in the past few hours.

The UN warns that the “fuzzy” provisions of the Hong Kong Security Act open the door to irregularitiesThe UN warns that the “fuzzy” provisions of the Hong Kong Security Act open the door to irregularities

The rule lists four categories of crime: secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with a foreign country or external elements to endanger national security. The maximum sentence for any crime is life imprisonment, although the proposed sentence for some minor crimes is three years in prison.