The Tunisian President appoints Najla Buden Romdhane as Prime Minister and asks her to form a government

Romdhane is the first woman in the country’s history to hold this position

Tunisia’s President Kais Saied on Wednesday appointed Najla Buden Romdhane as prime minister as the first woman in the country’s history and asked her to join the new government “as soon as possible”.

The Tunisian President appoints Najla Buden Romdhane as Prime Minister and asks her to form a government
The Tunisian President appoints Najla Buden Romdhane as Prime Minister and asks her to form a government

“The President, Kais Saied, entrusts Najla Buden Romdhane with the formation of the new government as soon as possible after Presidential Decree 117 on extraordinary measures,” said the Tunisian Presidency in a short message published on his account on the social network Twitter

Saied emphasized that it was “a historic moment, an honor for Tunisia and a homage to Tunisian women”. “We will work with firm determination to fight corruption and the anarchy that reigns in many institutions,” he said.

Saied has also stressed the need to form the new executive “in the next few hours or days” to focus on fighting the various crises the country is going through and meeting popular demands, such as the Tunisian state news reported agency, TAP.

With this in mind, the President recognized that “too much time has already been lost” and at the appointment ceremony stressed the need to “start work in accordance with the provisions of the exceptional measures announced in July”.

For her part, the President of the Tunisian Federation of Democratic Women (ATFD), Neila Zoghlami, has estimated that the appointment of Buden Romdhane is part of the organization’s demands on Saied, given the guaranteed parity in the institutions.

However, in statements to the Tunisian radio station Mosaique FM, Zoghlami stressed that the program, the powers and the composition of the government he heads were more important than the fact that Buden Romdhane had become prime minister of the African country.

The appointment came more than two months after Saied ordered the suspension of parliament and dismissed Prime Minister Hichem Mechichi as part of a series of extraordinary measures aimed at recruiting any powers that sparked complaints of a coup in the country.

The Tunisian president then reiterated that his decision was a reaction to the previous days’ mobilizations against the management of the pandemic, corruption and the severe economic crisis and defended at all times that it was based on the constitution.

Although the Tunisian constitution does not allow the dissolution of parliament, it advocates suspending its functions for a period of 30 days. The president’s subsequent actions, including several extensions of these measures, were condemned by the country’s main party, the Islamist Ennahda, which called for an end to the exceptional measures.

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