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The search for deadly victims of the passage of Hurricane ‘Dorian’ through the Bahamas continues

MARSH HARBOR (BAHAMAS), Sep 9 (Reuters / EP) –

Rescue services continue to work in the most devastated areas of the Bahamas following the passage of Hurricane 'Dorian' to try to locate the bodies of the deceased. So far, 43 fatalities have been confirmed, but it is feared that the death toll will be much higher as the areas from which the waters have already been removed are registered.

A Reuters correspondent has witnessed how workers, dressed in white monkeys, search the area using geolocation devices to mark the locations of bodies in the Mudd neighborhood, in Marsh Harbor, on the Great Abaco Island.

The search for deadly victims of the passage of Hurricane ‘Dorian’ through the Bahamas continues
The search for deadly victims of the passage of Hurricane ‘Dorian’ through the Bahamas continues

Meanwhile, humanitarian agencies continue the work of distributing food and other essential supplies while the authorities try to manage the huge number of displaced people, with thousands of people who have traveled to the capital, Nassau. Hundreds more have fled to the United States.

On Sunday, the Bahamas National Emergency Management Agency reported that 2,500 people have been evacuated from Bahamas, the vast majority coming from Abacus, one of the regions most hit by a storm that generated gusts of up to 320 kilometers per hour.

The Agency has reported that some 1,100 people have stayed in the shelters, while many others have been welcomed by friends and family. Thus, he has urged families whose homes have not been damaged to open their doors to accommodate displaced people.

The World Food Program (WFP) estimates that 90 percent of Marsh Harbor buildings and infrastructure are damaged and has warned that many of those displaced do not have adequate access to water, electricity or sanitation facilities.

In addition, WFP suggests that there are some 70,000 people who need food or shelter and insurers estimate damage to insured properties around the Caribbean at about 3 billion dollars. The risk of diarrhea or dysentery outbreaks due to aquifer contamination is also high, according to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO).

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