The parliamentary elections in Iraq saw 41 percent turnout, the lowest in years

Iraqi polling stations closed that Sunday evening with a turnout of around 41 percent, one of the lowest in recent years in elections held amid widespread frustration with the political class.

That appointment has resulted in the lowest turnout of the six elections held since the fall of the Saddam Hussein regime in 2003 following the U.S. invasion of Iraq, the lowest turnout ever of 44.5 percent in 2018, DPA collects.

The parliamentary elections in Iraq saw 41 percent turnout, the lowest in years
The parliamentary elections in Iraq saw 41 percent turnout, the lowest in years

The head of the EU election observation mission for the Iraq elections, Viola von Cramon, for her part, admitted in the middle of the day that the turnout was only 19 percent despite the low turnout at noon. According to the National Electoral Commission, the process was “calm and peaceful”.

However, in statements collected by the Rudaw news agency, von Cramon highlighted the atmosphere of disenchantment that has reigned in the country after months of economic crisis and has further undermined confidence in the Iraqi political class.

“Participation tells us a lot. It is a signal for politicians and an expectation that they will pay attention to the message,” he warned.

In contrast, the Iraqi Prime Minister Mostafá al Kazemi had asked the population to vote in the parliamentary elections.

“Choose Iraq, vote for the future of our next generations,” said Al Kazemi, who ultimately failed to mobilize the citizens.

The early parliamentarians were convened after the grave political crisis plunged into the country following massive mobilizations in 2019 that forced the government to resign and pass a new electoral law.

The protests that broke out in October 2019 and claimed more than 550 deaths – according to the official balance sheet from July 2020 – were a new sign of the population’s disillusionment with the political class in the face of numerous cases of corruption, the poor state of public services and the prevailing economic crisis in Iraq.

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