The National Election Jury of Peru describes Fujimori’s cancellation request as “extraordinary”.

The President of the National Election Jury (JNE) of Peru, Jorge Salas, described the annulment complaints of the presidential candidate Keiko Fujimori and her party Fuerza Popular in 802 polling stations as “extraordinary”. 200,000 votes.

In statements to the Peruvian media RPP Noticias, Salas pointed out that the 2011 presidential election saw only two cancellations, compared to almost thirty in the 2016 elections, an “important difference” from the current ones. .

“The Peruvian electoral system thinks of very small things when it comes to appeals. What is happening now is extraordinary,” said the president of the Peruvian electoral body.

The National Election Jury of Peru describes Fujimori’s cancellation request as “extraordinary”.
The National Election Jury of Peru describes Fujimori’s cancellation request as “extraordinary”.

As a result, it has refused to indicate the timing of resolving the challenges posed by Fujimori, as they must first go through the special electoral juries, which would take around three days to convene hearings and another three days to respond. After that, as Salas explained, they would go to the JNE, which had different deadlines.

“With more than 800 announced, I think it would be reasonable to think that there should be a minimum amount of time to decide what is relevant without having to run over,” he added, highlighting that ” nobody wants “three-minute resolutions with the material impossibility of analysis”.

Fujimori denounced on Monday the “table fraud” of the Peru Libre party, its rival in the elections, Pedro Castillo, who was declared the winner on Tuesday.

Regarding the denunciation of the Fuerza Popular candidate, the American director of the NGO Human Rights Watch (HRW), José Miguel Vivanco, said Wednesday that Peru “should respect the results” and avoid defective allegations of fraud “serious” evidence.

“In Peru, as in any democracy, the election results must be respected,” Vivanco urged on his Twitter profile, where he emphasized that “international human rights law requires that every vote be counted and respected.”

Meanwhile, the test is nearing its end and reaches 99.126 percent, with Castillo leading the election result with 50.2 percent of the vote, compared to Fujimori’s 49.7 percent, according to the ONPE on the portal results of the second presidential round on June 6th.

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