Business

The heads of a Tyson facility are betting how many of their workers would get COVID-19 if they were forced to work in the pandemic

An unlawful death lawsuit alleges the facility covered up the outbreak.

3 min read

This article has been translated from our English edition.

The heads of a Tyson facility are betting how many of their workers would get COVID-19 if they were forced to work in the pandemic
The heads of a Tyson facility are betting how many of their workers would get COVID-19 if they were forced to work in the pandemic

This story originally appeared on Business Insider

An unlawful death lawsuit alleges that the managers of the pork processing plant owned by Tyson Foods In Waterloo, Iowa, they are betting money on how many workers would contract the virus in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. This emerges from a complaint filed on Wednesday originally in the Iowa Capital Shipping.

“Defendant Tom Hart, the plant manager at the Waterloo plant, organized a group of cash buy bets, and the winner takes whatever supervisors and managers had bet on how many employees would test positive for COVID-19,” claims the court document.

The lawsuit was filed in August by the family of Isidro Fernández, a Tyson meat packer who died of COVID-19 in April, alleging the facility downplayed concerns and covered up an outbreak at the meat processing facility. Meat for workers to get ahead, reports Associated Press.

In court documents, plaintiffs allege more than 1,000 workers at the plant contracted the virus and five died. In May, the Black Hawk County Health Department announced that more than 1,000 people, or about a third of all workers at the plant, tested positive for COVID-19 or had antibodies.

The lawsuit, which has been forwarded to a United States District Court for the Northern District in Iowa, Eastern Division, has since been amended to include a number of new charges relating to the condition of the facility in March and April and the administration’s complaints.

The other allegations made in the lawsuit include that at the start of the pandemic, low-ranking supervisors with little or no training were hired because managers avoided the plant with increasing cases.

The lawsuit also alleges that a top executive specifically stated that he would ignore the symptoms and labeled the virus a “glorified flu” that court documents said no one should be worried about Business Insider.

The amended lawsuit also alleges that the company introduced a $ 500 bonus for employees who showed up for three months for all scheduled shifts to keep sick workers on board, according to court records.

Tyson did not respond to a request for comment from Business Insider at the time of publication; We will update as needed.

The company did not respond to the amended complaint. He previously said he denied these claims and had “worked since the pandemic began to adhere to federal guidelines for workplaces and invested millions of dollars in equipping employees with safety and hazard mitigation devices”.

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