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The EU discusses on Monday sanctions against Turkey for its offensive in Syria and its illegal surveys in Cyprus

France, Germany, the Netherlands and Finland have already suspended arms exports to Turkey and Sweden and Denmark pose an EU-wide embargo

BRUSSELS, Oct. 13 (EUROPE PRESS) –

European Union foreign ministers will discuss next Monday in Luxembourg to impose sanctions on Turkey in response to the Turkish military offensive against Kurdish militias in northeastern Syria, whose stoppage has claimed the block to Ankara, as well as for its surveys “Illegal” of hydrocarbons in waters of the exclusive economic zone of Cyprus, issues that will also be addressed at the summit by the heads of State and Government when they meet in Brussels next Thursday and Friday.

France, Germany, the Netherlands and Finland have already suspended arms exports to Turkey in response to their military offensive, while Sweden and Denmark propose extending the arms embargo to Turkey to the EU as a whole.

The EU discusses on Monday sanctions against Turkey for its offensive in Syria and its illegal surveys in Cyprus
The EU discusses on Monday sanctions against Turkey for its offensive in Syria and its illegal surveys in Cyprus

Other partners such as Spain find it necessary to address the option of sanctions “very carefully” to avoid “escalation”, while other countries such as the United Kingdom have not yet considered this option. “Turkey has more than enough weapons. An embargo will not stop an offensive,” warn diplomatic sources.

“The response will be adapted according to the evolution of the situation,” explained other diplomatic sources, who see decisions prematurely already on Monday and remember that European leaders meet at the end of the week.

The High Representative of the EU's Common Foreign and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini, insisted on Thursday that the Turkish military intervention “has no legal basis” and that Ankara should cease it “as soon as possible” but avoided arguing with the president Turkish, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, for his threat to “open the doors” of Europe to Syrian refugees if he described his offensive as “an invasion.”

For his part, the president of the European Council, Donald Tusk, has labeled Erdogan's words “totally out of place”, before making it clear that they will not be blackmailed by Erdogan.

The head of European diplomacy has admitted that the offensive will have “an impact on migration flows clearly” because “there has been in the past” but has made it clear that “it would be a mistake” if Europeans “questioned” the aid of 6,000 million euros committed to Ankara for Syrian refugees for the offensive, insisting on the need to prevent refugees from becoming “twice” victims. “This money does not go to Turkey, it goes to the agencies that supported the refugees,” he stressed.

Of course, the block has already made it clear that they will not provide financing for the security zone that Ankara wants to create at the border, making it clear that it would be “unacceptable” to try to force any ethnic demographic change.

The EU fears the human cost that the Turkish offensive may have in terms of civilian casualties, the increase in displacement, inside and outside Syria, but also that it harms the UN's efforts to relaunch the process of negotiations between the Bashar Government al Assad and the Syrian opposition – something that the Twenty-eight will address on Monday with the UN special envoy for Syria, Geir Pedersen – as well as the progress in the fight against the Islamic State, a priority point for countries such as France and United Kingdom

Cyprus and Greece will also propose that the block impose “targeted” sanctions in response to hydrocarbon surveys by Turkey in waters of its exclusive economic zone after sending a ship last Friday to the area, although Spain also asks to be cautious.

The Twenty-eight suspended high-level contacts with Turkey and the air transport agreement negotiations in June and agreed to lower European pre-accession aid for Turkey planned in 2020 and for the European Investment Bank (EIB) to review its loans to the country by These activities that they consider “illegal” in light of International Law and violate the sovereignty of Cyprus and demanded to prepare “options” for “targeted” sanctions, something they will address on Monday.

In any case, it would be a question of identifying people and companies that participate in these activities, although eventually it could also include restrictions on the supply of equipment for exploration.

EU Foreign Ministers will also give a green light on Monday to a legal framework – already agreed at ambassadorial level – to impose, in case of a deterioration of the political crisis in Nicaragua, sanctions against those responsible for violations Human Rights or repression of the civilian population and the opposition in the country or undermine democracy, as well as the associated persons.

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