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The DUP announces that it will not support the Brexit agreement agreed by Johnson

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) announced on Thursday that it will not support the agreement reached by Prime Minister Boris Johnson with the EU so that an organized Brexit can take place on October 31.

The training led by Arlene Foster has denounced that the agreement is contrary to the Good Friday Agreements that put an end to the conflict in Northern Ireland and that it is not beneficial for the Norwegians.

The DUP has stressed that at all times it has made it clear that it would only support “agreements that are in the long-term economic and constitutional interest of Northern Ireland and protect the unity” of the United Kingdom.

The DUP announces that it will not support the Brexit agreement agreed by Johnson
The DUP announces that it will not support the Brexit agreement agreed by Johnson

However, he has denounced that what is now agreed by the 'premier', with “all goods subject to a customs control regime regardless of their final destination,” will make Northern Irish consumers “face the prospects of higher costs and potentially less choice due to controls to facilitate the European Union. ”

With regard to VAT, the unionist party has added in its statement, “Northern Ireland is subject to provisions that the rest of the United Kingdom will not have.”

In addition, he has criticized that although some progress has been made, “the elected representatives of Northern Ireland will have no voice” in deciding whether the agreement is accepted. “The Government has moved away from the principle that these provisions should be subject to the consent of both unionists and nationalists in Northern Ireland,” the DUP has denounced.

“For all these reasons, we believe that these provisions will not be in the long-term interest of Northern Ireland,” the unionist party has ruled, anticipating that Saturday's vote in the House of Commons “will only be the beginning of a long process to get the Withdrawal Agreement “approved.

In order for the agreement to proceed, it needs the approval of the European leaders and the European Chamber, as well as the British Parliament, which Johnson has called for ratification on Saturday.

In the House of Commons, approval requires the favorable vote of 320 of the 650 deputies. The Government would only hope if it manages to get on board the Eurosceptic conservatives, the 35 independent deputies and the ten members of the DUP.

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