Suu Kyi appears in person before the Burmese judiciary for “inciting sedition” after months of postponement

The former “de facto leader” of Burma Aung San Suu Kyi went to court this Monday in the country’s capital, Naipyidó. It is her first personal appearance before the judiciary after she was accused of “inciting hatred”. after his arrest almost four months ago in the context of the February 1st coup.

During the hearing, Suu Kyi insisted that its founding, the National League for Democracy (NLD), “was created for the people and will last as long as the people are there,” according to the Myanmar Now news agency.

He has drawn attention to the intention of the electoral committee created by the military to investigate its own allegations of fraud in the November elections with a view to banning and disbanding the party.

Suu Kyi appears in person before the Burmese judiciary for “inciting sedition” after months of postponement
Suu Kyi appears in person before the Burmese judiciary for “inciting sedition” after months of postponement

The hearing lasted half an hour, his legal team confirmed, indicating that a large security team was deployed in the area. At around 9:00 am, Suu Kyi was able to meet her lawyer for the first time in months.

“He said that he prayed everyone would be fine,” said lawyer Min Min Soe, according to information from the Frontier Myanmar news portal.

With that in mind, he stated that the case “has been brought to the Supreme Court, which has ordered that the case be dealt with by a special court near the NLD leader’s house in the Burmese capital”.

The sedition charge is the most serious of any charged as a result of the military coup. However, she was also accused of violating state secrets and coronavirus containment regulations.

The attorney also confirmed that she was able to independently meet with Suu Kyi before the hearing, where they discussed her legal situation. Min also stressed that he was in good health. He is due to return to court on June 7th.

While Suu Kyi has videoconferenced numerous questions over the past few weeks, her lawyers have not had access to the detainee.

The military electoral board declared in late February – after the height of the coup – the existence of a fraud in favor of the NLD. This claim was denied by international observers such as the Asian Free Election Network (ANFREL), who noted that “although there were certain irregularities,” most of them were due to the effects of the pandemic and fighting between the army and separatists, “The Results of the 2020 elections were representative of the will of the Burmese people. “

Since then, demonstrations have taken place in different parts of the country. The Burma Political Prisoners Support Association estimates that more than 800 people have died as a direct result of military action against demonstrators since the coup. In addition, more than 5,300 people were arrested.

The Chamber insists, however, that these numbers have been “inflated” by the media and that in this way the deaths from the protests do not exceed 300.

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