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Surprise favourite has no connection to Abe

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A PRO-ASIA policy expert from Japan’s ruling Liberal DemocraticParty, Yasuo Fukuda, was rapidly building support yesterday for histilt at party leadership among factions disenchanted with rivalTaro Aso, an ally of the outgoing Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe. (Sydney Morning Herald — 15 September, 2007)
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Yasuo Fukuda emerges as runaway leader to become Japan’s next primeminister after a survey of ruling party lawmakers. (The Age — 18 September, 2007)
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Surprise favourite has no connection to Abe
Surprise favourite has no connection to Abe

Yasuo Fukuda emerged today as runaway leader to become Japan’s nextprime minister after a survey of ruling party lawmakers who mustchoose between the soft-spoken veteran and his hawkish rival TaroAso next weekend. – Brisbane Times (The Brisbane Times — 17 September, 2007)
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Former Foreign Minister Taro Aso declared his candidacy Friday to replace Japan’s hospitalized prime minister, running as the conservative choice against dovish former Cabinet secretary Yasuo Fukuda. (MSNBC — 14 September, 2007)
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A dovish former Cabinet secretary said Friday he would run to replace hospitalized Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, as the ruling party faced rising pressure to call early elections. (CNN — 14 September, 2007)
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The race to succeed outgoing PM Shinzo Abe hots up, as two key candidates indicate they plan to run. (BBC News — 14 September, 2007)
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Japan’s ex-foreign minister Taro Aso says his rival Yasuo Fukuda is most likely to win the contest to become PM. (BBC News — 16 September, 2007)
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Two candidates vying to become Japan’s next prime minister began nationwide campaigns Monday, avoiding thorny domestic issues but vowing to keep pressure on North Korea to resolve the past kidnapping of Japanese citizens. (MSNBC — 18 September, 2007)
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TOKYO, Sept. 13 — The departure of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who stunned Japan on Wednesday by announcing that he was quitting after a year in power, appears likely to weaken his party’s long hold on political power, embolden an already cocky opposition and stall economic reform. (Washington Post — 12 hours ago)
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TOKYO, July 29 — Prime Minister Shinzo Abe vowed Sunday to stay in office despite leading his scandal-stained ruling coalition to a humiliating defeat in parliamentary elections. (Washington Post — 16 September, 2007)
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