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Study shows AstraZeneca and Oxford vaccine cause a strong immune response

October 26, 2020

Bristol University researchers were able to review thousands upon thousands of instructions “photocopied” by the Oxford vaccine in a cell and validate that the injection worked exactly as programmed.

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Study shows AstraZeneca and Oxford vaccine cause a strong immune response
Study shows AstraZeneca and Oxford vaccine cause a strong immune response

Oxford University reported in a statement that the Oxford University and AstraZeneca’s ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 COVID-19 vaccine (also known as AZD1222) had provided satisfactory results in terms of “accurate” compliance with programmed genetic instructions by the university’s team of scientists as well the induction of a “strong immune response”.

The study assessed the frequency and precision with which the potential vaccine copies and carries out the genetic instructions given in it, including making the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein.

ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 was made from a chimpanzee cold virus (adenovirus), eliminating 20% ​​of the genetic instructions contained in the virus. This process prevents its replication or infection in humans, but allows its production in laboratories.

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This deletion gives the virus room to receive new instructions regarding the spike protein, and once inside the human body a process known as transcription takes place where the genetic instructions of the spike protein become available “photocopied” many times.

In this way, the immune system recognizes the virus protein and reacts accordingly to prepare for an actual COVID-19 infection.

“This is an important study as we can confirm that the genetic instructions underlying this vaccine, which evolves as quickly as possible, are correctly followed when entering a human cell,” said Dr. David Matthews. Virology reader at the School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Bristol University.