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Seventy years since the unfinished war between the two Koreas began

June 24, 2020

On June 25, 1950, North Korean troops invaded South Korea, which would be the beginning of an unfinished war today. Seven decades later, the two neighboring countries are facing the anniversary of this conflict amid escalating political tensions and far from the 2018 approach that led to the idea of ​​a hypothetical peace treaty.

The division of the Korean peninsula dates back to 1945, when the then dominant powers, the United States and the Soviet Union, used the 38th parallel as a line to share power. The two countries shared territory and influence in search of a geopolitical balance that was blown up five years later.

An invasion of North Korean troops again shook the military table, which involved more than twenty countries and nearly two million soldiers. The Soviets and Chinese supported North Korea, while the United States was the main proponent on the south side to fend off a conquest that was frustrated in the Nakdong River.

Seventy years since the unfinished war between the two Koreas began
Seventy years since the unfinished war between the two Koreas began

The warlike push and pull led to long peace negotiations, forged on July 27, 1953 in an armistice signed by North Korea and the United States, in which the 38th degree of latitude was set as a reference, a pseudo-boundary that still exists the most militarily and politically tense areas in the world.