Senate rebels reject Bush terrorism bill

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The Bush Administration is heading for a showdown with seniorRepublicans in the Senate. – (The Age — 16 September, 2006)
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Senate rebels reject Bush terrorism bill
Senate rebels reject Bush terrorism bill

THE Bush Administration is heading for a showdown with seniorRepublicans in the Senate, and the confrontation is likely toinfluence the outcome of midterm elections in November. – (Sydney Morning Herald — 16 September, 2006)
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The Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday voted 15-9 to recommend a bill — over the objections of the Bush administration — that would authorize tribunals for terror suspects in a way that it says would protect suspects’ rights. (CNN — 15 September, 2006)
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Questioning of suspected terrorists “won’t go forward” unless Congress clarifies a U.S. standard for the treatment and interrogation of detainees, President Bush warned Friday. (CNN — 16 September, 2006)
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Faced with a revolt by some fellow Republicans over treatment of foreign terrorism suspects, President Bush on Friday vigorously defended his strategy at a press conference Friday.� [!] (MSNBC — 16 September, 2006)
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President George W. Bush and congressional Republicans spent the last 10 days laying the foundation for a titanic pre-election struggle over national security, and now they have one. (International Herald Tribune — 16 September, 2006)
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U.S. lawmakers are rushing to pass a bill on the treatment of terrorism suspects that would have minimal impact on antiterrorist operations but could cause profound damage to justice and the American way. (International Herald Tribune — 16 September, 2006)
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Senate Republicans blocked Democratic attempts to rein in President George W. HBush’s domestic wiretapping program Wednesday, endorsing a White House-supported bill that would give the controversial surveillance legal status. (International Herald Tribune — 14 September, 2006)
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The president made it clear that he is not abandoning the main pillars of his anti-terrorism agenda despite opposition by key Republican senators. (New York Times — 16 September, 2006)
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President Bush yesterday announced the transfer of the last 14 suspected terrorists held by the CIA at secret foreign prisons to the military detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and said he wants to try them before U.S. military panels under proposed new rules he simultaneously sent to… (Washington Post — 6 minutes ago)
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President Bush’s push this week for legislation that narrowly defines U.S. obligations under the Geneva Conventions is motivated by his aides’ conviction that the CIA must continue using a small number of highly controversial interrogation techniques on suspected terrorists, according to current and… (Washington Post — 17 September, 2006)
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A scuffle over the White House plan for dealing with terrorism suspects has stoked old tensions between Pentagon civilian leaders and military officers. (New York Times — 16 September, 2006)
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