Next Big Hurdle in Health Debate Is Public Option

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A day after the Senate Finance Committee approved a measure without a public option, the question is how the president can reconcile party divisions on the issue. (New York Times — 15 October, 2009)
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The Senate Finance Committee will hold a landmark vote on health-care reform legislation Tuesday that is expected to underscore the deep partisan divisions that have emerged and hardened over five months of debate. (Washington Post — 14 October, 2009)
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Next Big Hurdle in Health Debate Is Public Option
Next Big Hurdle in Health Debate Is Public Option

Most of the serious proposals to fulfill President Obamas vow to curb health care costs have fallen victim to organized interests and parochial politics. (New York Times — 12 October, 2009)
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A second Republican senator signaled Wednesday she’s open to voting for sweeping health care legislation this year, putting President Barack Obama closer to a historic achievement that has eluded generations of Democratic leaders. (MSNBC — 15 October, 2009)
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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday that the case is growing stronger for allowing the government to sell health insurance in competition with private companies, contending recent attacks from the industry should dispel any doubts. (MSNBC — 16 October, 2009)
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The Senate Finance Committee will hold a landmark vote on health-care reform legislation Tuesday that is expected to underscore the partisan divisions that have hardened over five months of debate. (MSNBC — 13 October, 2009)
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Select senators and White House officials set to finalize legislation behind closed doors, in contrast with Obama’s earlier call for open negotiations. (Washington Post — 18 October, 2009)
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The report released by the lobbying organization Americas Health Insurance Plans, or AHIP, was dismissed by experts as a hatchet job, but it may have led to a better bill. (New York Times — 17 October, 2009)
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