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US unveils new policy of engagement with Sudan

October 2, 2018
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(The Age — 6 hours ago)
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An official said the White Houses policy would use a mix of incentives and pressure to end the human rights abuses that have burnished Darfur into the American conscience. (New York Times — 17 October, 2009)
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The White House hopes to build pressure on the government to end the abuses that have left millions of people dead or displaced in the Darfur region. (New York Times — 15 hours ago)
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Advocates of a tougher approach toward Khartoum said they had feared the White House would take an even more conciliatory line toward the government. (New York Times — 19 October, 2009)
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Critics rebuked the new policy as nave while supporters said it reflected common sense. But both camps agree it has Maj. Gen. J. Scott Grations fingerprints all over it. (New York Times — 7 hours ago)
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President Barack Obama said Monday that the U.S. will shift its policy toward Sudan to one based on working with the Khartoum government instead of isolating it. (MSNBC — 8 hours ago)
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After lengthy debate, the Obama administration has settled on a policy toward Sudan that offers a dramatically softer approach than the president had advocated on the campaign trail — but steers clear of the conciliatory tone advocated by his special envoy to the country. (Washington Post — 18 October, 2009)
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The Obama administration will unveil a new Sudan policy with an eye toward engaging the Khartoum government but also warning that more violence in Darfur will result in penalties, officials say.

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(MSNBC — 18 October, 2009)
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The Obama administration’s new policy toward Sudan, formally announced Monday, turns the spotlight back on where the troubled nation’s problems first began: the split between the Islamic north and the largely animist and Christian south. (Washington Post — 8 hours ago)
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