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Seized library computers may hold Ivins clues

August 31, 2018
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Computers seized last week from a Frederick, Md., library may hold clues about the 2001 anthrax letters and the Army scientist accused of mailing them, the FBI said Thursday. – (Sydney Morning Herald — 3 hours ago)
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After the suicide last week of Bruce Ivins, suspect in the 2001 anthrax mailings that killed five people, a colleague said investigators had gone after the wrong person. Dr. Russell Byrne described his “consternation at the ridiculous motives they’re attributing.” (MSNBC — 5 August, 2008)
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Bruce E. Ivins, the late microbiologist suspected in the 2001 anthrax attacks, had attempted to poison people and his therapist said she was “scared to death” of him, according to court testimony that emerged Saturday. (MSNBC — 3 August, 2008)
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Late last fall, Bruce E. Ivins was drinking a liter of vodka some nights, taking large doses of sleeping pills and anti-anxiety drugs, and typing out rambling e-mails into the early morning hours, according to a fellow scientist who helped him through this period.

(Washington Post — 6 August, 2008)
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Skepticism from members of Congress and from those who knew Bruce E. Ivins has placed the F.B.I. under scrutiny. (New York Times — 5 August, 2008)
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Even as the FBI closed in, Bruce Ivins had access to U.S. Army facility’s most dangerous laboratories.

(Washington Post — 5 August, 2008)
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For nearly seven years, scientist Bruce E. Ivins and a small circle of fellow anthrax specialists at Fort Detrick’s Army medical lab lived in a curious limbo: They served as occasional consultants for the FBI in the investigation of the deadly 2001 anthrax attacks, yet they were all potential sus…

(Washington Post — 3 August, 2008)
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A federal judge unsealed the papers as the Justice Department prepared to declare the case solved. (New York Times — 7 August, 2008)
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