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Scientist Set to Discuss Plea Bargain In Deadly Attacks Commits Suicide

August 30, 2018
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Authorities investigating the deadly 2001 anthrax mailings used previously unavailable techniques to trace the lethal powder to the office where scientist Bruce E. Ivins worked at the sprawling Army biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick, Md., according to sources briefed on the investigation.

(Washington Post — 8 August, 2008)
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Government officials asserted yesterday that a troubled bioweapons scientist acted alone to perpetrate a terrorism scheme that killed five people, a case that centered on a near-perfect match of anthrax spores in his custody and a record of his late-night laboratory work just before the toxic… (Washington Post — 8 August, 2008)
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Leading suspect in the 2001 attacks borrowed equipment from a bioweapons lab, sources say.

(Washington Post — 5 August, 2008)
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Even as the FBI closed in, Bruce Ivins had access to U.S. Army facility’s most dangerous laboratories.

(Washington Post — 5 August, 2008)
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Anthrax attack suspect Bruce E. Ivins took several hours of administrative leave from his Fort Detrick, Md., laboratory on a critical day in September 2001 when the first batch of deadly letters was dropped in a New Jersey mailbox, government sources briefed on the case said yesterday.

(Washington Post — 8 August, 2008)
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The FBI today will begin to unveil how it exploited the rapidly advancing science of genetics to link a single bioweapons researcher to samples taken from the victims of the 2001 anthrax attacks and to powder from the letters that killed them.

(Washington Post — 6 August, 2008)
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The key clues that led the FBI to Army scientist Bruce E. Ivins ranged from the infinitesimally small — tiny bits of genetic coding on a single anthrax spore — to items as ordinary as a time stamp on a building security pass.

(Washington Post — 7 August, 2008)
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Lacking hard proof, U.S. federal prosecutors relied on the process of elimination and circumstantial evidence to finger Bruce Ivins as the anthrax killer. (MSNBC — 7 August, 2008)
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For years, Ernesto Blanco has been haunted by questions about who carried out the 2001 anthrax attacks, which left him hospitalized for 27 days. Yesterday, the Florida resident felt he finally got some answers.

(Washington Post — 7 August, 2008)
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The Bush administration on Wednesday partially lifted the veil of secrecy on its anthrax investigation, privately presenting details to victims’ families after a �judge ordered the release of records. (MSNBC — 7 August, 2008)
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WASHINGTON – Army scientist Bruce Ivins had custody of highlypurified anthrax spores with ‘certain genetic mutations identical’to the poison that killed five and rattled the United States in2001, according to documents unsealed today in the government’sinvestigation. – Brisbane Times (The Brisbane Times — 7 August, 2008)
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Bruce E. Ivins was the type of colleague who would leave a package of M&Ms on the desk of his frazzled boss. He was a “Survivor” junkie who loved deconstructing the latest episode at work. He was known for his groundbreaking development of new-generation vaccines for anthrax but he also kept a…

(Washington Post — 7 August, 2008)
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Emergent BioSolutions, the Rockville biotech that is supplying the U.S. government with 18.75 million doses of anthrax vaccine, has had its share of successes and setbacks in the last few years.

(Washington Post — 8 August, 2008)
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