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Pyongyang set to return to nuclear talks

August 17, 2018
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North Korean leader Kim Jong Il says his regime will return tosix-party nuclear disarmament talks if the US shows sincerity andif certain conditions are met. (Sydney Morning Herald — 22 February, 2005)
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North Korean leader Kim Jong Il says he is ready to resume six-party talks on his country’s nuclear weapons program if the United States shows sincerity and if certain conditions are met. (CNN — 22 February, 2005)
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The United States and other parties in the six-party talks over North Korea’s nuclear program are “ready to return to the table at an early date and without preconditions,” U.S. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Tuesday. (CNN — 23 February, 2005)
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Kim Jong Il has told a Chinese envoy that he would be willing to resume diplomatic negotiations when “conditions are ripe.” (New York Times — 23 February, 2005)
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Kim Jong-il says North Korea may rejoin negotiations on its nuclear ambitions, the official KCNA news agency reports. (BBC News — 23 February, 2005)
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China’s official news agency cited an unnamed North Korean official as saying Saturday that Pyongyang is not ready to return to six-party nuclear disarmament negotiations and does not want a bilateral meeting with the United States. (MSNBC — 20 February, 2005)
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Japan’s prime minister says North Korea should stop denouncingTokyo and instead rejoin multilateral talks on dismantling itsnuclear weapons program. (Sydney Morning Herald — 24 February, 2005)
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The United States and Japan on Saturday strongly urged North Korea to resume international talks about its nuclear weapons program and expressed hope of working with China to ensure peace with Taiwan. (CNN — 20 February, 2005)
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North Korea has accused Japan of aspiring to rule a “Greater East Asia Co-prosperity Sphere” beginning with an invasion of Korea with the assistance of the United States. (CNN — 21 February, 2005)
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A top Chinese envoy sought to persuade North Korea to rejoinnuclear disarmament talks. (Sydney Morning Herald — 21 February, 2005)
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The Bush administration should use its leverage with China and South Korea to get out of the current stand-off with North Korea. (International Herald Tribune — 6 hours ago)
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North Korea’s decision to pull out of talks on its nuclear programme appears to have been triggered by US intelligence of proliferation. (BBC News — 21 February, 2005)
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Expressing deep concern about North Korea’s nuclear weapons program, senior U.S. and Japanese officials pressed the communist nation to soon resume international talks aimed at halting its arms development. (Washington Post — 20 February, 2005)
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China issued a stiff protest Sunday over an updated U.S.-Japanese strategic agreement, saying its reference to Taiwan violates China’s national sovereignty and its criticism of China’s military buildup is “untenable.” (Washington Post — 21 February, 2005)
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To Pyongyang, hearing the phrase “no hostile intent” from the United States looms large as the diplomatic equivalent of the Holy Grail. Yet Bush has never uttered them. (Washington Post — 22 February, 2005)
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