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More than 2000 women, an average of four a day, have disappeared in Guatemala in the last year

September 30, 2019

MADRID, 30 Sep. (EUROPA PRESS) –

A total of 2,086 women have disappeared in Guatemala between August 2018 and September 2019, which means four complaints of disappearance per day, according to the Isabel-Claudina alert, a mechanism for the immediate search of missing women in the country coordinated by the prosecution.

The Public Ministry, which has provided this data in the framework of the 'No more missing women' campaign, has detailed that, of the 2,086 alerts for missing women, 1,604 have been deactivated, although it has not specified whether these women have appeared alive or not. The other cases (482) are still open, according to the local newspaper 'Prensa Libre'.

In addition, the figures show that it is women between 21 and 30 who disappear the most, followed by those in the range of 18 to 20 years. As for the days of the week, Friday, Saturday and Sunday is when they disappear the most and these losses occur most frequently between 6 am and 12 noon.

According to data from the Public Prosecutor's Office, 5 percent of the women disappeared due to fights with the couple and 3 percent from a family argument. On the other hand, the province where most disappearances have occurred is Guatemala, with 838 cases, followed by Quetzaltenango, with 132, and Escuintla, with 115 cases.

“The issue is very alarming, because in Guatemala, when a woman disappears, it is because she will no longer be found alive,” said the director of the Survivors Foundation, Norma Cruz, who added that the number is estimated Disappearances are greater because some cases are not reported and women who appear dead are also added.

“And, apart, you must wait 72 hours to declare a woman missing, and in many cases, waiting for that time is to declare the woman dead,” Cruz lamented.

The Isabel-Claudina alert aims to guarantee a prompt location and safeguard, within or not the country, the disappeared Guatemalans, to prevent them from being victims of violence due to being a woman.

He receives that name in memory of two missing women, María Isabel Véliz, 15, and Claudina Velásquez, 19, who finally appeared lifeless.