Skip to content

IOC admits Internet censorship deal with China

June 28, 2018
Related News about IOC admits Internet censorship deal with China

Sort by: Relevance : Date

Some Olympics officials cut a deal to let China block sensitive Web sites despite promises of unrestricted access, a senior IOC official admitted on Wednesday. (MSNBC — 31 July, 2008)
+ related stories

A senior IOC official admits that committee members had cut a deal to let the Chinese government block sensitive Web sites, despite earlier assurances to the contrary. (CNET News.com — 31 July, 2008)
+ related stories

BEIJING, July 30 — The International Olympic Committee and the Chinese government acknowledged Wednesday that reporters covering the Olympics will be blocked from accessing Internet sites that Chinese authorities consider politically sensitive.

(Washington Post — 31 July, 2008)
+ related stories

IOC president applauds organization of Summer Games, says there was no deal with Chinese government to restrict journalists’ Internet access. (CNET News.com — 12 hours ago)
+ related stories

The Chinese authorities, bowing to criticism, lifted some of the restrictions, but other politically sensitive sites remained inaccessible. (New York Times — 1 August, 2008)
+ related stories

China plunged into another Olympic controversy on Wednesday as it announced that the thousands of foreign reporters covering the Games would have to endure Internet censorship. – (Sydney Morning Herald — 30 July, 2008)
+ related stories

In a reversal of previous statements, the International Olympic Committee said it had never agreed to allow China to limit Internet access to foreign journalists during the Games. (New York Times — 1 August, 2008)
+ related stories

A handful of sites were opened to reporters on Friday and a working group is now examining other sites, one by one, to determine if other sites should be available. (New York Times — 2 August, 2008)
+ related stories

Olympic organizers are backtracking on another promise about coverage of the Beijing Games, keeping in place blocks on Internet sites in the Main Press Center and venues where reporters will work. (CNN — 31 July, 2008)
+ related stories

BEIJING — Three state-of-the-art Olympic media centers in Beijing have been equipped with rows of brand-new computers. Thousands of English-speaking volunteers stand at the ready, trained to offer Internet access with a smile.

(Washington Post — 6 hours ago)
+ related stories

President Hu Jintaos press conference on Friday was the first he has held in Beijing in the six years he has served as Chinas top leader. (New York Times — 2 August, 2008)
+ related stories

Page1