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In Pakistan, a Deadly Resurgence

June 24, 2018
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ISLAMABAD, Pakistan, Oct. 12 — At summer’s end, there were hints of optimism in the battle against Pakistan’s Islamist insurgents. The military said it had routed the Taliban from the verdant Swat Valley. A CIA missile had killed the Pakistani Taliban’s chief — so shaking the group, U.S. and Pa… (Washington Post — 14 October, 2009)
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RAWALPINDI, Pakistan, Oct. 10 — Militants staged a deadly attack on the Pakistani army headquarters Saturday in the most audacious indication yet of their willingness to battle the government — even at the doorstep of the nation’s large and powerful security forces. (Washington Post — 14 October, 2009)
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The blast was the most deadly attack in the Swat Valley since the end of an offensive against militants there over the summer. (New York Times — 13 October, 2009)
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ISLAMABAD, Pakistan, Oct. 11 — Pakistani commandos stormed a building within the nation’s army headquarters early Sunday, freeing 39 hostages and ending a 22-hour standoff with their armed Islamist captors that revealed deep vulnerabilities in Pakistan’s defense systems. (Washington Post — 14 October, 2009)
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Gunmen stormed the Pakistani Army headquarters and took more than a dozen security officers hostage, producing a standoff that continued into the evening. (New York Times — 11 October, 2009)
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The attack on Saturday, which left four gunmen dead, targeted the nerve center of the Pakistani Army. (New York Times — 10 October, 2009)
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Pakistan’s military is preparing for what may be one of its most significant offensives in years against a major Taliban stronghold near Afghanistan, according to Pakistani and U.S. officials and local residents. (Washington Post — 8 October, 2009)
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Officials said the militant who survived an assault on Saturday was behind two other major attacks and the police had warned the Pakistani military that a raid was being planned. (New York Times — 12 October, 2009)
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ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — As American troops move deeper into southern Afghanistan to fight Taliban insurgents, U.S. officials are expressing new concerns about the role of fugitive Taliban leader Mohammad Omar and his council of lieutenants, who reportedly plan and launch cross-border strikes from … (Washington Post — 8 October, 2009)
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