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Hong Kong protesters suspend their protests Wednesday to commemorate 9/11

September 11, 2019

HONG KONG, Sep 11 (Reuters / EP) –

Hong Kong protesters have suspended their protests this Wednesday to commemorate the anniversary of the attacks on September 11, 2001 in the United States, which killed more than 2,000 people in New York and Washington.

Demonstrations have taken place in Hong Kong for months, some of them with violent incidents, to express their rejection of the extradition law that the Hong Kong Government planned to approve and which, after the pressure of the protests, has ended up withdrawing.

The rule would have allowed extradite to mainland China for suspects in crimes detained in the former British colony. The protests have evolved to become manifestations of rejection of Chinese rule and in defense of democracy.

Protesters have suspended protests on Wednesday to show their solidarity “against terrorism”, as reported in a statement, although there is a possibility that chanting of the case against the government may be heard.

“The fact that they try to frame the protest with those words worries me since they are predicting more than informing,” said another protester, referring to information published by the Chinese state newspaper 'China Daily'.

Protesters have suspended protests for Wednesday, September 11 “in solidarity against terrorism,” as reported in a statement, although there is a possibility that chanting of the case against the government may be heard.

On Tuesday, the official Chinese newspaper 'China Daily' published information in which he warned that the protesters would be preparing violent acts for the protests of this September 11, an end denied by protesters who have paid tribute to the victims of the attacks in the United States. “The fact that they try to frame the protest with those words worries me since they are predicting rather than informing,” said one protester.

“Fans opposed to the government are planning terrorist attacks, which include blowing up gas pipelines, in Hong Kong on September 11,” notes the information published by 'China Daily' on their Facebook page.

“The terrorist plot also encourages indiscriminate attacks against people who are not native speakers of Cantonese and start a mountain of fires,” the official newspaper has predicted.

“It is not necessary to verify the facts to know that it is false news,” said a young protester in reference to the news published by 'China Daily'. “The state media don't care about credibility,” said the young man.

On Tuesday, some soccer fans challenged Chinese law by booing the national anthem during a qualifying match against Iran for the World Cup. Several peaceful demonstrations are planned for the next few days, which will coincide with the celebrations of the Mid-Autumn Festival, a tradition from China.

Hong Kong was a British colony until in 1997 it joined China under the precept of 'one country, two systems', which guarantees certain freedoms that China does not offer its citizens and has a legal system independent of the rest of the country.

The head of the Hong Kong Government, Carrie Lam, has withdrawn the bill, but many residents fear the loss of city autonomy in favor of China. The Asian country has denied its intervention in Hong Kong and accuses the United States and the United Kingdom, among other countries, of encouraging violent demonstrations.