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Grenade discovery overshadows Bush’s praise of Georgian freedom

June 13, 2018
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A hand grenade was discovered within 30 metres of George Bushduring the US President’s speech in the Georgian capital, Tbilisi. – (Sydney Morning Herald — 12 May, 2005)
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A hand grenade described as inactive is found near where President Bush spoke to crowds in Georgia. (BBC News — 12 May, 2005)
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Washington: An object thought to be a hand grenade was thrown close to US President George W. Bush as he gave a speech in front of thousands of Georgians in Tbilisi. Standing near Mr Bush was Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili. (The Australian — 12 May, 2005)
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Georgia’s security chief said that an inactive grenade had beenfound near the site where US President George Bush made a speech inTbilisi. – (Sydney Morning Herald — 11 May, 2005)
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A possible hand grenade was thrown close to US President George W.Bush on Wednesday as he gave a speech in front of tens of thousandsof Georgians in Tbilisi, the US Secret Service says. (Australian Financial Review — 11 May, 2005)
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U.S. officials are investigating a report that an apparent hand grenade landed about 100 feet from where President Bush was speaking Tuesday in Tblisi, the capital of Georgia, a Secret Service spokesman said. (CNN — 11 May, 2005)
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The Secret Service disclosed that a device, possibly a hand grenade, was thrown at the stage during President Bush’s speech in the Georgian republic. (New York Times — 11 May, 2005)
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The US Secret Service says a possible hand grenade was thrown toward a stage in Georgia where President George W Bush was giving a speech. – (Sydney Morning Herald — 11 May, 2005)
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President Bush warned President Vladimir Putin of Russia that the sovereignty of Georgia “must be respected by all nations.” (New York Times — 11 May, 2005)
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Bush’s visit to Georgia, after the ceremonies marking the end of the war in Moscow’s Red Square on Monday raised the ire of Russia. But, as NBC News’ David Gregory reports, Bush’s hero’s welcome in Tbilisi was crucial to recognize the ongoing legacy of the end of� WWII. (MSNBC — 11 May, 2005)
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