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Correa asks for elections in Ecuador and affirms that he will be candidate “if necessary”

October 9, 2019

Call to “go outside” and call into question the credibility of the UN and the Church as mediators

BRUSSELS, Oct. 9 (EUROPE PRESS) –

The former president of Ecuador Rafael Correa has called on Wednesday from Brussels to hold early elections as the only solution to the week of protests in the country against the government's economic reforms, while ensuring that “if necessary” he himself would be candidate.

“If I need to be a candidate, I will be,” he told reporters at an appearance at the headquarters of the European Parliament, where he has been invited by MEPs of United Podemos.

Correa, on which weigh two arrest warrants in Ecuador and a disqualification to be president, has said he has “no problem” to attend as a candidate for positions other than the president – “from the vice presidency I can participate below” – – but has pointed out the possibility of being arrested if he returns

“They are going to create those problems, they are going to look for how to prevent that participation, because they know we defeated them at the polls. Let's see what they will invent,” he said, after calling the two arrest warrants “ridiculous” and considering “illegal and unconstitutional “your disqualification.

“I would return to the country, that they put me in prison, but that they let me register to be a candidate. They will not leave me,” Correa insisted, who says that if he presents his candidacy his case will be comparable to that of the Brazilian Lula da Silva, at that “they put prisoner” to stop his candidacy and now the president is “the fascist (Jair) Bolsonaro”.

“Democracy was stolen from Brazil and they will try to do the same in Ecuador,” said Correa, who argues that “the legal situation will change (in Ecuador) when the political situation changes, and that is why they do not want to release power.”

In addition, he has flatly rejected the accusations that point him to instigating the protests. “It is a psychiatric case,” said his successor, Lenin Moreno, who accuses him of being behind a conspiracy to promote a coup in the country. Correa has denied that he has traveled to Venezuela or other places in the region to participate in such plans, has criticized “caveman speeches” and “brutal repression” against the population protesting in the streets. “They are the coup plotters, we are asking for a democratic exit,” he concluded.

Thus, Correa has expressed his support to those who take to the streets to join the protests against the Government and the package of economic reforms agreed with the International Monetary Fund, while defending that the incidents are “isolated” and that The violence is the result of the “brutal repression” of the authorities against the indigenous protesters.

“I believe that the Government is finished, but they want to sustain it at all costs,” said the former Ecuadorian president, to explain the riots and that there are victims and detainees in the protests.

Thus, Correa has supported the protests, although he has asked the population to “defend their rights firmly, but in peace and taking care of themselves”, because, in their opinion, the authorities “seek any pretext” to repress and “fill us with fear”. “Our Constitution establishes the right to resistance,” he has argued.

Asked about the role that both the United Nations and the Ecuadorian Episcopal Conference can play in this crisis, Correa has said that he sees this initiative with “hope and fear”, that he wants it to work, but that he has doubts about it.

“I have hope, but fear because the intermediaries do not give me confidence and, in any case, I do not know how they will solve it,” he said, to warn later that if there is an agreement to revoke the measures that are at the origin of the protests, then the Moreno Government will not have “any legitimacy” and “the agreement with the IMF will be dropped.”