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Mimblewimble in Litecoin already has a trial version and is integrated in the basic code

May 4, 2020

The main developer of Litecoin’s Mimblewimble (MW) project, David Burkett, has now created a functional test framework and has started to integrate the previous development work into the Litecoin code base.

According to a report on May 1 in the Litecointalk forums, the project to implement MW data protection improvements in Litecoin has reached an important milestone with the construction of a test bench. Burkett claims that he also ran some end-to-end validation tests on the framework.

“I created a functional testing framework that creates valid headers, blocks, and transactions. Now I have some (mostly) full end-to-end block validation tests,” he said.

Mimblewimble in Litecoin already has a trial version and is integrated in the basic codeMimblewimble in Litecoin already has a trial version and is integrated in the basic code

As Cointelegraph reported in March, Burkett predicted that MW would run on Litecoin’s test network in late summer. This is an important step towards this goal.

Basic code integration

Burkett has also started to integrate his work into the Litecoin code base, initially focusing on the ConnectBlock logic. This part of the code checks the blocks before adding them to the chain.

While Burkett was still unsure of which specific area to address next, he said his high-level plan included continued base code integration and “much more testing.”

Burkett also released an update to his other project, Grin ++, which has just reached Release Candidate Status v1.0.0 and marks its “first non-beta version”. Grin ++ introduced the first implementation of the Mimblewimble privacy protocol in January 2019.

Mimblewimble was first revealed in 2016 when its white paper, written by a person under the pseudonym Tom Elvis Jedusor, was released on a Bitcoin research channel.

The protocol aims to improve the privacy, scalability and fungibility of the blockchain by combining transactions in a CoinJoin. As a result, blocks in the network form a list of all input, output and signature data, thereby obscuring the transaction data for third parties who monitor the network.

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