Lebanon’s prime minister will convene the first government meeting since October next week

Lebanon’s Prime Minister Nayib Mikati will convene a government session next week that has not held meetings on the investigation into the August 2020 blasts in the port of Beirut since October due to the Hezbollah and AMAL blockade.

Parliamentarian Ali Daruish, a member of the Mikati bloc, has said that the prime minister will convene this meeting for January 24, adding that the budgets will be discussed two days later, according to Lebanese news portal Naharnet.

Also, in statements to Al Yumhuria newspaper, sources close to Mikati stressed that the Ministry of Finance will finalize the preparation of the budgets in the coming days. “The Prime Minister will convene the Cabinet to study them as soon as he receives them,” they said.

Lebanon’s prime minister will convene the first government meeting since October next week
Lebanon’s prime minister will convene the first government meeting since October next week

The same sources have stated that the Prime Minister hopes to hold the general elections on the scheduled date of May 15 and that he hopes that Al Mustaqbal leader and former Prime Minister Saad Hariri will attend the process.

“Hariri’s presence in Liabno at this time is very important and crucial,” these sources said, adding that Mikati hopes the prominent Sunni politician will take part in the elections either personally or through his political bloc.

Government meetings could resume after Hezbollah and AMAL announced over the weekend that they would rejoin them after a three-month boycott over their protest against the judge leading the investigation into the blast, Tarek Bitar.

The two formations, who said they refuse to be “unjustly accused of the blockade,” pledged their ministers are now ready to attend all government meetings devoted to approving budgets and discussing the recovery plan.

Mikati and Lebanese President Michel Aoun agreed in early January to convene an extraordinary session of parliament and reactivate government sessions to try to deal with the country’s severe political, economic and social crisis, which has raised alarms from the international community.

The Lebanese currency has collapsed in recent months, causing prices to soar drastically in a crisis that prompted the World Bank in June 2021 to declare the latter to be one of the worst global declines since the mid-19th century. Per capita GDP up about 40 percent since 2018.

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