News

Lab loaned device to anthrax suspect

Related News about Sources: Lab loaned device to anthrax suspect

Sort by: Relevance : Date

The leading suspect in the 2001 anthrax attacks borrowed equipment from a bioweapons lab, sources say. (MSNBC — 5 August, 2008)
+ related stories

Bruce E. Ivins, the government’s leading suspect in the 2001 anthrax killings, borrowed from a bioweapons lab that fall freeze-drying equipment that allows scientists to quickly convert wet germ cultures into dry spores, according to sources briefed on the case. (Washington Post — 5 August, 2008)
+ related stories

Lab loaned device to anthrax suspect
Lab loaned device to anthrax suspect

Leading suspect in the 2001 attacks borrowed equipment from a bioweapons lab, sources say.

(Washington Post — 5 August, 2008)
+ related stories

Authorities investigating the deadly 2001 anthrax mailings used previously unavailable techniques to trace the lethal powder to the office where scientist Bruce E. Ivins worked at the sprawling Army biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick, Md., according to sources briefed on the investigation.

(Washington Post — 8 hours ago)
+ related stories

Government officials asserted yesterday that a troubled bioweapons scientist acted alone to perpetrate a terrorism scheme that killed five people, a case that centered on a near-perfect match of anthrax spores in his custody and a record of his late-night laboratory work just before the toxic… (Washington Post — 11 hours ago)
+ related stories

Even as the FBI closed in, Bruce Ivins had access to U.S. Army facility’s most dangerous laboratories.

(Washington Post — 5 August, 2008)
+ related stories

For nearly seven years, scientist Bruce E. Ivins and a small circle of fellow anthrax specialists at Fort Detrick’s Army medical lab lived in a curious limbo: They served as occasional consultants for the FBI in the investigation of the deadly 2001 anthrax attacks, yet they were all potential… (Washington Post — 4 August, 2008)
+ related stories

After the suicide last week of Bruce Ivins, suspect in the 2001 anthrax mailings that killed five people, a colleague said investigators had gone after the wrong person. Dr. Russell Byrne described his “consternation at the ridiculous motives they’re attributing.” (MSNBC — 5 August, 2008)
+ related stories

The FBI today will begin to unveil how it exploited the rapidly advancing science of genetics to link a single bioweapons researcher to samples taken from the victims of the 2001 anthrax attacks and to powder from the letters that killed them.

(Washington Post — 6 August, 2008)
+ related stories

Skepticism from members of Congress and from those who knew Bruce E. Ivins has placed the F.B.I. under scrutiny. (New York Times — 5 August, 2008)
+ related stories

Page1

Similar Posts