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Johnson responds to Brussels that he will not appoint a commissioner until after the elections in the United Kingdom

BRUSSELS, Nov. 14 (EUROPE PRESS) –

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has responded on Thursday to the future president of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, that the British Government will not designate any candidate for European commissioner, as the European Union demands, until they are held in United Kingdom elections on December 12.

“We have written to the European Union to confirm that the pre-election guidelines state that the United Kingdom should not normally present candidates for international positions during this period,” sources from the British Government have told Europa Press.

Johnson responds to Brussels that he will not appoint a commissioner until after the elections in the United Kingdom
Johnson responds to Brussels that he will not appoint a commissioner until after the elections in the United Kingdom

The European Union insists that among the obligations of the United Kingdom as a member state is not to alter the proper functioning of the European institutions, something that London argues that it wants to avoid and is willing to cooperate so as not to block the formation of the new Commission.

Although the Community Executive is reluctant to officially clarify whether Von der Leyen and his team could take possession despite the British withdrawal, the EU legal services study the options that will allow the new legislature to start at Twenty-seven, according to various European sources.

In recent weeks, Von der Leyen has sent up to two letters to London urging Johnson to present “one or several names” of commissioner candidates “as soon as possible”, since the German conservative needs a British representative to close the structure of his College of Commissioners and submit it to the Eurochamber exam.

The new Community Executive should have taken over from Jean-Claude Juncker on the first day of November, but the delay in the confirmation of several applicants forced the EU to delay the investiture of the new Commission until December 1.

The Twenty-seven granted last September a new extension to the United Kingdom to delay Brexit until January 31, 2020, but he did so reminding London that as long as the country remained part of the community club it would also have to fulfill its “obligations” of Member State, including the appointment of a new commissioner.

London resigned last summer to have a representative in the new Commission because Brexit was scheduled to take place before the Von der Leyen College of Commissioners took office, but the calendar change forces him to do so now. With the letter received by Brussels last night, the British do not resign but postpone their designation.

London, on the other hand, defends that in no case it tries to frustrate the good operation of the European institutions but that the electoral rules in the United Kingdom do not allow to act otherwise.

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