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How to stand out as a graduate (according to one of your top votes)

July 4, 2020

Many of the youngest graduates strive to use all the means that allow them to stand out in the job market, and in recent years LinkedIn has become the main area to improve the visibility of professionals.

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How to stand out as a graduate (according to one of your top votes)How to stand out as a graduate (according to one of your top votes)

This story originally appeared on Medialab_UP

By Sebastián Escárcega

It’s no secret that the first few months after that leave the university They can be one of the most difficult phases for professionals. During this time, it is common to feel disadvantaged when applying for a job or stagnation compared to numerous jobs that require prior knowledge.

Many of the youngest graduates strive to use all the means that allow them to stand out in the job market, and in recent years LinkedIn has become the main area to improve the visibility of professionals.

If there is someone who knows how profitable this social network can be, it is Juan Del Cerro, who has been recognized by LinkedIn as one of the Top votes from your website in Latin America. The National Award 2018 winner also has 17,000 followers on this social network, sharing corporate advice and sharing the progress of his companies Disruptivo.tv and Socialab México.

Del Cerro, with whom we had the opportunity to chat remotely, gave some tips for those who have just graduated and want to differentiate themselves from employers through LinkedIn.

Create an attractive profile

Image: Depositphotos.com

It’s not hard to imagine that the last thing a recruiter is interested in is checking a profile that says little or nothing about a professional. It is recommended to complete your profile with a presentable photo and information about your studies, your skills and any kind of work experience – yes, Probono projects or student positions also count.

“The worst thing you can have is a profile that you enter and there is nothing,” says Juan.

The guru also emphasizes that LinkedIn can give you recommendations. This is a great tool for validating your profile information.

Use LinkedIn as a social network

Image: Depositphotos.com

This point has to do with spending time on the website. It doesn’t matter whether you comment, like, or post, the main thing is to start interacting.

“When you start and feel like you have nothing to say, ask questions: ‘I’m looking for Chamba, what do you recommend?’ Or ‘I’m a mechatronic engineer, what would be the best company for?’ “Suggests the founder of Disruptive.tv.

He adds that the idea of ​​using LinkedIn is to create new contacts because “there is no point in just adding people I already know”. Interacting with the right people can open new doors and even make it easier for potential employers to find us.

An obstacle to compliance with this second recommendation can be the uncertainty caused by the lack of experience in using the platform. However, Del Cerro assures that this can only be overcome with practice: “The best way to understand a social network is to use it. “

Connect with executives and topics that interest you

Image: Greg Bulla on Unsplash

Del Cerro not only shares content, but also believes that younger professionals can be part of the conversation by joining different groups on LinkedIn and following managers and pages of relevant companies in all areas of interest. This allows us to know the priorities, concerns, and updates of our preferred work area.

The entrepreneur emphasizes that this point can also make a difference if someone comes across our profile.

“The same and you have no work experience, but you participate and comment on a lot of posts. They show that you are very interested and active. “

Finally, LinkedIn’s Top Voice highlights that being on such a social network is a great way for graduates to continue their education in their areas of interest.

“For those who believed that the university was over, for nothing. Today we live in a world that is changing so that you have to learn all the time,” Del Cerro concludes.