Dozens of women take part in a new protest in the capital of Afghanistan to defend their rights

Dozens of women took part in a new protest in the Afghan capital of Kabul this Tuesday to urge the authorities set up by the Taliban after they came to power in August 2021 to respect their rights.

The demonstration took place the day after activists painted several walls in the capital to protest the Taliban’s new restrictions and denounce the suppression of concentrations in recent months.

Dozens of women take part in a new protest in the capital of Afghanistan to defend their rights
Dozens of women take part in a new protest in the capital of Afghanistan to defend their rights

“Our protests have faced threats and violence, so we have used murals to achieve our basic rights and we will continue these protests,” Tamana Razaie, one of the protesters, told Afghan TV station Tolo TV.

Leda, another protester, said that “the murals are a new way of protesting to claim rights because the Taliban often responded to protests with violence”.

With this in mind, another protester, Aziz Gul, stressed that “women’s rights are restricted in their choice of clothing, work and education.” “We will not be silent and raise our voices,” he emphasized in explanations of the chain mentioned.

Activist Navida Jurasani has emphasized that “women today are not women 20 years ago”. “Our new protest methods will spread to all provinces and we will use all possible means to raise our voices,” he promised.

For his part, the deputy spokeswoman for the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, Inamulá Samangani, has assured that the authorities are working to ensure employment and educational opportunities for women. “The Islamic Emirate has not hindered women’s rights,” she said despite the restrictions imposed.

The murals and rally came after authorities posted notices on Kabul’s walls and trees urging women to wear hijabs after ordering the beheading of mannequins and access to public toilets in several provinces last week had forbidden.

In late December, the authorities banned the women from long trips on their own and required them to be accompanied by a close relative. The ban on playing music in cars and the presence of women who do not wear a hijab have also been introduced.

Previously, in December in Kabul, they removed pictures of women from posters and advertisements. The mayor’s office of the capital pointed out that these images “are in conflict with the ‘Sharia'” and stressed that “ethical values ​​and boundaries must be respected”.

The Taliban have formed a government shaped by a lack of women and representatives of other political groups. Nonetheless, Afghanistan’s Deputy Prime Minister Abdulsalam Hanafi stressed in October that this executive branch was “inclusive”, adding that the fundamentalist group had tried to include all ethnic groups and social sectors in the new authorities.

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