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Corbyn accuses Johnson of racism and of having increased inequality in the United Kingdom

December 7, 2019
El primer ministro Boris Johnson y el lĂ­der del Partido Laboralista, Jeremy Corbyn durante un debate celebrado en la BBC, Londres

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Labor Party leader Jeremy Corbyn during a debate held at the BBC, London – VIA REUTERS / HANDOUT.

MADRID, Dec. 7 (EUROPE PRESS) –

The leader of the British Labor Party, Jeremy Corbyn, accused Friday the prime minister, Boris Johnson, of having made “racist comments” and of having led to an increase in inequality in the United Kingdom following his latest economic and social policies, during a debate held in the studios of the BBC public network.

“Leadership failure is when you use racist comments to describe people from different countries or from our society. I hope the prime minister understands the pain people feel when he hears comments or reads articles of this kind, such as those he has written.” , Corbyn said.

The words of the progressive leader referred to texts in which Johnson described black people as “bold” with “watermelon smiles”, and others in which he compared Muslim women who wore veils with “bank robbers” and “mailboxes.”

“I hope you regret that and understand the importance of using respectful language towards people of all religions, races,” said Corbyn, who has defended himself in this way from Johnson's accusations of anti-Semitism in his training.

For his part, Johnson has said that all politicians in his party who have been singled out for their racist behaviors or comments are “out of action.” The accusations about racism have starred in the most tense moments of the televised debate this Friday, as the newspaper 'The Guardian' has also shown.

During the first part of the debate two very different visions for the future of the country have been exposed. While Jonhson has advocated capitalism and the free market for a post-Brexit UK, Corbyn has argued that “democratic socialism” in the Scandinavian style “has raised the living standards of the poorest.”

“The inequality has grown,” warned the Labor leader, for whom the latest conservative policies in the United Kingdom have led to “poorer than ever” and up to “150 billionaires” in the country.

Both leaders have also engaged in a dispute regarding the future of the British public health service. The NHS has been in the mouth of conservatives and Labor during the entire election campaign, since Corbyn accused Johnson of marketing with people's health due to the trade agreement in which the Government is working with the Donald Trump Administration.

Corbyn and Labor have denounced that such a trade agreement with the United States endangers the public health system, as it would allow US companies to access some NHS services, such as drugs, thus increasing the price of medicines in United Kingdom.

Johnson has ridiculed these accusations by claiming that they are “Bermuda Triangle” things. For the conservative leader, the next thing Corbyn will do is talk about “little green men.”

During the debate, the British consultant YouGov has published a survey in which 52 percent has given Johnson the winner of the debate, compared to 48 percent who believed Corbyn was. On the other hand, the Labor leader has been seen by 48 percent of respondents as a “reliable” politician, while the conservative has only gained 28 percent confidence.