Canada is appealing the ruling ordering compensation for indigenous children who are discriminated against in the provision of services

The Canadian government on Friday appealed a federal court ruling ordering compensation for Indigenous children who have been discriminated against in the provision of government services and forced to leave their homes to gain access to them.

Justin Trudeau’s executive branch submitted the appeal file within the deadline set by the federal court, which ratified a 2016 ruling by the Canadian Court of Human Rights in late September requiring a payment of 40,000 Canadian dollars – 27,000 euros – to each of the minors concerned or their families, as the child welfare system was not financed from the reserves.

Indigenous Services Minister Patty Hajdu has indicated that although the government has appealed the court decision, it is working with affected groups to reach a compensation agreement later this year “to implement an approach that serves children better “. “, Reports the Canadian network CBC.

Canada is appealing the ruling ordering compensation for indigenous children who are discriminated against in the provision of services
Canada is appealing the ruling ordering compensation for indigenous children who are discriminated against in the provision of services

The government wants to reach a consensus outside the courts, an option that the representatives of the minors in the case will have from next Monday, November 1st, with the participation of the Society for the Care of Children and Families of the First Nations and the Assembly of the First Nations.

Indeed, the executive director of the first of these groups, Cindy Blackstock, agreed to negotiate an agreement, but warned that the indigenous part would “go to the hearings quickly” if none were reached.

However, he has shown his opposition that the government has “agreed a schedule for accelerated meetings” and regrets that this does not seem to stop “the aggression” against the community.

For her part, national First Nations Assembly leader Rose Anne Archibald said she was “disappointed” that the executive was “continuing to appeal” despite saying that it was “setting a deadline for approval” .

The appeal against the decision of the Federal Court of Justice was based on the fact that the Court of Human Rights had erroneously “acted sensibly” in its decision to order financial compensation for the children and families concerned.

“Canada recognizes the establishment of systemic discrimination and does not challenge the general principle that indigenous people should be compensated (…). However, the orderly granting of compensation to individuals (…) was not compatible with nature the lawsuit, evidence, prior jurisprudence and Canadian human rights law, “the executive has defended.

The dispute over compensation dates back 14 years when the executive director of the First Nations Society for the Care of Children and Families warned that Ottawa’s behavior would be racially discriminatory because child services on the reservations are not funded.

Some estimates put the number of children potentially affected at around 50,000, with the largest number in the province of British Columbia. The ruling also affects children on reservations in the Yukon.

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