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Blue Origin and NASA aim to achieve lunar-like gravity in the New Shepard rocket


The POT Y. Blue origin, Aerospace company Jeff Bezoscome together to emulate the moon’s gravity in the rocket New Shepard, the company.

“The unique gravity of the lunar surface is one of many variable conditions under which certain technologies for the moon must perform well,” said the space agency’s statement.

Blue Origin and NASA aim to achieve lunar-like gravity in the New Shepard rocket
Blue Origin and NASA aim to achieve lunar-like gravity in the New Shepard rocket

The first step in reaching this milestone is to convert the ship’s capsule into a centrifuge, just like that of the washing machines, but much more powerful.

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“With the New Shepard updates, the vehicle can use its reaction control system to give the capsule a spin. As a result, the entire capsule essentially acts as a large centrifuge to create artificial gravity environments for the payloads inside, ”the NASA statement said.

On the other hand, this innovation is expected to be ready by the end of 2022 and will be a complement to the Artemis program that seeks to bring a man and, for the first time, a woman to the moon in 2024.

On the first test flight, before the big goal of getting cargo and crew to the moon, a goal of 11 revolutions per minute is sought to provide more than two minutes of continuous lunar gravity, exposing the technology to challenging and difficult conditions.

What you want to achieve

One of the constant challenges of living and working in space today is reducing gravity, according to Christopher Baker, director of NASA’s flight opportunities program. ”

He added that many of the systems developed for astronauts on Earth do not work the same elsewhere. New Shepard seeks to improve lunar gravity time and payload capacity.

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“Currently, NASA can approximate the moon’s gravity on parabolic flights and in centrifuges in suborbital vehicles, both of which are invaluable options for the maturation of promising innovations. However, these methods each offer only seconds to be exposed to the moon’s gravity or limit the size of the payload, forcing NASA to investigate options of greater duration and size. Blue Origin’s new lunar gravity test feature, expected to be available in late 2022, responds to this need. “

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