Bennett doubts that Lapid will become prime minister in the face of a possible premature overthrow of the Israeli government

Israeli Prime Minister Naftali Bennett has questioned the possibility that the rotation agreement with Yair Lapid will come about in 2023 due to a possible premature government collapse, according to Channel television.

“I think the rotation won’t happen,” he said at a closed meeting last month. “There is a considerable possibility that the government will disintegrate for various reasons between the approval of the budget and the moment of power transfer,” he added.

Bennett doubts that Lapid will become prime minister in the face of a possible premature overthrow of the Israeli government
Bennett doubts that Lapid will become prime minister in the face of a possible premature overthrow of the Israeli government

Bennett’s office responded to the information with a statement appearing to confirm statements, despite stressing that the Prime Minister “will fully comply with the rotation agreement, as he said from the start”.

“With regard to the adoption of the budget that guarantees the stability of the government, there is predictable information on various statements from different moments, which were only given as estimates,” he said.

He also stressed that “the alliance with the alternative prime minister and foreign minister, Yair Lapid, is based on mutual respect and justice,” as the Israeli newspaper The Times of Israel has put together.

In doing so, Bennett’s office has stressed that “the budget will be approved and the alliance upheld,” while Lapid is described as an “excellent secretary of state” who has made “tremendous efforts” to maintain stability in the coalition.

Bennett himself has assured himself through his account on the social network Twitter that the information “does not reflect” his position or his commitment to the coalition agreement. “We shook hands,” he said.

Lapid has confirmed he had a conversation with Bennett on Thursday and has declined what he calls a “transparent effort” to divide them. “It’s not going to happen. Both the prime minister and I have one goal: to approve the budgets and strengthen the government,” he argued.

The government must get budget approval before November 14th – this would be the first in more than three years – or it would be automatically dissolved, which would trigger new elections.

The new executive was created in June following a multi-party agreement that ended the era of Benjamin Netanyahu as prime minister, who had been in office for twelve years.

The coalition ultimately consists of an amalgamation of parties such as Blue and White, the Labor Party, Yisrael Beiteinu, Meretz and New Hope as well as Yesh Atid, Yamina and the Joint Arab List. It controls 61 of the 120 seats in the Knesset.

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