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Army reviews security at anthrax lab

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The Army has created a team of medical and other military experts to review security measures at the research laboratory where the scientist linked to the anthrax mailings worked. (CNN — 9 August, 2008)
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Authorities investigating the deadly 2001 anthrax mailings used previously unavailable techniques to trace the lethal powder to the office where scientist Bruce E. Ivins worked at the sprawling Army biodefense laboratory at Fort Detrick, Md., according to sources briefed on the investigation.

Army reviews security at anthrax lab
Army reviews security at anthrax lab

(Washington Post — 8 August, 2008)
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Bruce E. Ivins, the government’s leading suspect in the 2001 anthrax killings, borrowed from a bioweapons lab that fall freeze-drying equipment that allows scientists to quickly convert wet germ cultures into dry spores, according to sources briefed on the case. (Washington Post — 5 August, 2008)
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Computers seized last week from a Frederick, Md., library may hold clues about the 2001 anthrax letters and the Army scientist accused of mailing them, the FBI said Thursday. – (Sydney Morning Herald — 8 August, 2008)
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Bruce E. Ivins was almost always in plain sight, offering assistance and misleading information, officials say. (New York Times — 8 August, 2008)
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Emergent BioSolutions, the Rockville biotech that is supplying the U.S. government with 18.75 million doses of anthrax vaccine, has had its share of successes and setbacks in the last few years.

(Washington Post — 8 August, 2008)
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The top suspect in the 2001 anthrax attacks was obsessed with a sorority that sat less than 100 yards away from a New Jersey mailbox where the toxin-laced letters were sent, authorities said Monday. (MSNBC — 5 August, 2008)
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Late last fall, Bruce E. Ivins was drinking a liter of vodka some nights, taking large doses of sleeping pills and anti-anxiety drugs, and typing out rambling e-mails into the early morning hours, according to a fellow scientist who helped him through this period.

(Washington Post — 6 August, 2008)
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