Amuay Journal: ‘A Bomb on the Doorstep’: Venezuela Fishermen Fight an Oil Giant

But he also suggested that his cousin might sometimes take his campaign too far.

“He is a fighter for society, but sometimes it’s time to leave it behind,” he said, before expressing support for the administration of President Nicolás Maduro and the assistance it had given his council.

Elio Coromoto Reyes Cuauro, 67, a retired university professor and owner of a small inn in Amuay, said the fight for justice had suffered from the political divisions among the fishermen. If they were more unified, he argued, more benefits might accrue to the village from Pdvsa, including much-needed improvements in public services like roads, schools and electricity.

Amuay Journal: ‘A Bomb on the Doorstep’: Venezuela Fishermen Fight an Oil Giant
Amuay Journal: ‘A Bomb on the Doorstep’: Venezuela Fishermen Fight an Oil Giant

“If the people don’t fight together, there isn’t any force and you can’t achieve the shared objectives,” he said.

The archives of Mr. Sanchez’s 21-year struggle are stuffed haphazardly in two briefcases in the small, green-and-mustard-colored cement home where he lives with his wife, 100 yards from the bay.

“This is why Pdvsa doesn’t like me,” he declared on a recent morning, smiling impishly, as he reached into one of the briefcases and started yanking out fistfuls of dog-eared and creased documents — formal complaints, legal papers, newspaper clippings, photographs. He spread them out on a glass table, which filled up quickly, then he grabbed the other briefcase and emptied its contents — more of the same — on a couch.

Continue reading the main story

Similar Posts