According to a survey, 40% of the population believe that members of the Peruvian government sympathize with the Shining Path

According to a poll published on Sunday, 40 percent of the Peruvian population believe that members of the Pedro Castillo government have sympathy for the Shining Path and the Movadef organization, which they associate with the terrorist group.

The Ipsos Peru poll shows that only 27 percent of respondents believe that the Castillo administration has no sympathy for the group, while 23 percent agree that there is an “important presence” of the Shining Path and Movadef within the executive .

According to a survey, 40% of the population believe that members of the Peruvian government sympathize with the Shining Path
According to a survey, 40% of the population believe that members of the Peruvian government sympathize with the Shining Path

Likewise, the poll shows that 80 percent of respondents consider the recently deceased Shining Path leader Abimael Guzmán to be a “genocide” or a “terrorist,” while 10 percent say he is “a political leader” or “an ideologist” for another ten percent that “doesn’t need”, according to the Peruvian newspaper “El Comercio”.

On the other hand, 79 percent “approve” the law promulgated by Castillo allowing the cremation of the bodies of those convicted of terrorism who died in prison, as in the case of Guzmán, while 17 percent oppose it and 4 percent are “imprecise” are. .

The survey was conducted between September 23 and 24 of 1,212 people in 24 departments and in Callao province, with an error rate of 2,815 and a confidence range of 95 percent, according to Ipsos Peru.

Political scientist Kathy Zegarra cited the appointment of Guido Bellido as prime minister despite investigations into alleged terrorist crimes and apology for terrorism, and that of Iber Maraví at the helm of the labor ministry despite police reports from him in connection with attacks in the 1980s as justification for these results.

He also pointed out that the executive branch “had a poor handling of communications” and argued that “the president lacked the greater powers of persuasion to address the death of Abimael Guzmán”. “He could have given the nation a message reflecting on the evil of terrorism, but he didn’t,” he said.

“There were many days of uncertainty about what would happen to his body. This has worsened the image of some citizens of the government,” said Zegarra in a statement to ‘El Comercio’.

Similar Posts