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5 Remote Working Myths Slack Found In The Pandemic

October 28, 2020

6 min read

This story originally appeared in the World Economic Forum

5 Remote Working Myths Slack Found In The Pandemic
5 Remote Working Myths Slack Found In The Pandemic

By Victoria Masterson

  • Avoiding the commute, saving money, and improving work-life balance are the most popular benefits of teleworking, according to Slack’s Telecommuting Experience Index.
  • Only 11.6% of those surveyed for the report say they want to return to office work all day.
  • 72.2% would like a hybrid remote office model.
  • The report also explores five myths about teleworking.

Not traveling to work, saving money, and improving work-life balance are the most popular benefits of teleworking, according to a new study.

A survey of 9,000+ knowledge workers in the US, UK, France, Germany, Japan and Australia conducted by Slack – the California-based collaboration tool – found that most of them worked happier remotely than in the office.

Only 11.6% say they want to go back to the office full-time, while 72.2% want a hybrid remote office model.

Slack’s Remote Employee Experience Index also gives you feedback on five common views on teleworking. He found that.

The index is based on data from a survey of 9,032 knowledge workers who identify themselves as

The index is based on data from a survey of 9,032 knowledge workers who identify themselves as

Image: slack

1. Workers don’t miss the 9-5 routine of working in the office

One of the biggest factors influencing a positive remote experience is the ability to break free from 9 to 5 and instead create a flexible schedule according to the index.

“Those with flexible hours are almost twice as productive as those who work between 9 and 5 and belong much better,” said Brian Elliott, vice president of Slack.

Most of the respondents in the Slack survey want a mix of home and office work.

Most of the respondents in the Slack survey want a mix of work at home and in the office / Image: Slack

2. Regular meetings are not the key to aligning employees

While many of us are used to turning meetings on and off in the office, those hours in the distant world may not be as effective. “For example, employees who attend weekly status meetings feel worse about their sense of belonging than employees who receive status updates asynchronously through digital channels,” says Elliott.

The interactions that have been found to have the greatest impact on employees’ sense of belonging are:

  • Bi-weekly team celebrations to recognize team members or their achievements.
  • Monthly team building activities.
  • Monthly games or unstructured group social activities.

3. Not all workers with children face the same challenge

Women with children in the United States face a disproportionate challenge in balancing work and childcare, according to the study. “The evidence clearly points to the lack of a strong social safety net, including publicly funded childcare,” says Elliott. “The government is unlikely to take decisive action to meet this need, so it is up to companies to fill the void.”

According to the study, it is more difficult for women with children to balance work and childcare.

It is more difficult for women with children to balance work and childcare, according to the study / Image: Slack

4. Teleworking experience is no worse for underrepresented groups

Black, Asian, and Hispanic workers have a higher rate of teleworking than their white counterparts, according to the Index.

“It’s not clear what combination of factors is causing this difference,” says Elliott. “Why does remote work help improve the experience? Have white workers in most white workplaces always felt more like community? Do people from minority groups have a better sense of community?” Why are you at home? “

The possibility that teleworking is “a great balancing force” is clear and unmistakable, he adds.

5. Executives and managers don’t find it easier to adapt to remote work

Human resource managers, especially middle-level managers, have been found to face some of the most serious problems with adapting to remote working. These include a sense of belonging, productivity, and stress and anxiety management.

“In the world of teleworking, the role of manager has evolved from gatekeeper to coach and social connector,” says Elliott. “Social bonds are more difficult to establish and maintain in a digital workplace.”

Organizations need to invest time and resources in providing HR managers with new tools to train and connect with their teams, he adds.

Individual employees and middle managers say they have the least sense of belonging.

Individual employees and middle managers say they have the least sense of belonging / Image: Slack

The World Economic Forum’s virtual return to work summit from October 20-23, 2020 will bring together business, government, civil society, media and public executives to develop a new program around the four basic areas of growth, jobs, skills and Justice.

Work, wages and job creation sessions will address issues such as investing in job creation, livelihood support and developing new standards for digital, physical and hybrid jobs.

The four-day program includes sessions to set new standards for the future of work. a new vision of health in the workplace and the assessment of workers and frontline workers.

The summit will also look at education, skills and lifelong learning in the wake of increasing digitalization, and examining how disruption to the economy and employment can be used to create greater social opportunities for all.